• Steel tariffs impacting food processors


    A food processor says the Trump administration’s tariff on steel is raising costs for them and consumers.  Paul Palmby is Chief Operating Officer for Seneca Foods.  He says, “Anybody that’s putting food in a can is affected by these tariffs.”

    Palmby says Seneca Foods has eight canning plants in Wisconsin and manufactures their own cans at their Baraboo, Wisconsin plant.  He tells Brownfield they support the domestic steel industry wholeheartedly and they buy a lot of it, but he would like to see the Trump administration exempt the tin-plated steel used in food cans from tariffs. 

    Continue reading Steel tariffs impacting food processors at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Pumpkin is a healthy food


    Pumpkin is a healthy food

    You can tell pumpkin is good for you by its color. Pumpkins are vegetables and their orange color indicates they are loaded with beta-carotene which converts to Vitamin A in the body. Vitamin A is an antioxidant which is good for your body because it can reduce the risk of certain diseases and it helps with eye health. University of Illinois Extension – Pumpkin recipes

    Continue reading Pumpkin is a healthy food at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • A cooler, more active pattern underway


    A cooler, more active pattern underway

        Across the Corn Belt, cool, breezy weather prevails. Significant lowland flooding persists in parts of the upper Midwest, particularly in northwestern Iowa and environs, following recent downpours.

    On the Plains, cool weather has replaced previously warm conditions. Meanwhile, heavy rain has developed across the southern Plains, halting fieldwork and causing local flooding, but generally benefiting rangeland and pastures.

    In the South, major to record flooding continues in parts of eastern North Carolina and northeastern South Carolina.

    Continue reading A cooler, more active pattern underway at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • A change in weather underway


    A change in weather underway

    Heavy rain falling across the south-central U.S. will spread eastward, reaching the central and southern Appalachians during the weekend. Storm-total rainfall could reach 2 to 6 inches from the southern Plains into the lower Ohio Valley. By early next week, a cold front crossing the northern U.S. will spark locally heavy showers (1 to 2 inches) in the Midwest.

    A surge of late-season warmth will precede the cold front. Elsewhere, dry weather will prevail during the next 5 days in most areas west of the Rockies.

    Continue reading A change in weather underway at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Farmers, businesses, Kind discuss tariffs


    A group of central Wisconsin farmers and business leaders sent a message to Washington D.C., saying tariffs and the lack of markets are hurting them.

    One of the farmers was National Farmers Union Vice President Patty Edelburg of Amherst Junction, who says they need two things.  “One, that we have a farm bill that’s going to be passed soon.  It expires at the end of the month so we absolutely need some type of a package that’s going to help farmers in the long run here. 

    Continue reading Farmers, businesses, Kind discuss tariffs at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Farm management specialist: MFP payments will relieve cash flow concerns


    Farm management specialist: MFP payments will relieve cash flow concerns

    A farm business expert says the USDA Market Facilitation Program payment is an unplanned injection of cash.  Iowa State University farm management specialist Steve Johnson says growers should get soybean production data to the Farm Service Agency (FSA) as soon as harvest wraps up.

    “I think farmers are going to be surprised that those first payments that they’re going to get on soybeans are going to at least reduce the amount of cash flow concerns they have this fall,” Johnson told Brownfield Ag News Friday.

    Continue reading Farm management specialist: MFP payments will relieve cash flow concerns at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Perdue to view NC ag damages Monday


    Perdue to view NC ag damages Monday

    Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue will travel to North Carolina Monday to survey agricultural damages from Hurricane Florence. The USDA says Perdue was invited by North Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. Damage assessments in North Carolina are in the early stages.

    In South Carolina, Clemson University Extension and the USDA estimate crop losses will be roughly 125-Million dollars across eight counties most severely affected by Florence.

    Continue reading Perdue to view NC ag damages Monday at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Hog futures pressured by supply concerns


    Hog futures pressured by supply concerns

    At the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, cattle futures ended the day higher ahead of widespread direct business in advance of Friday’s Cattle on Feed report. October live cattle closed $.62 higher at $113.07 and December contracts closed $.55 higher at $118.45.  September feeder cattle closed $1.27 higher at $156.95 and October feeder cattle closed $.80 higher at $158.07.

    A light trade finally developed in the South on Friday following the Cattle on Feed report. 

    Continue reading Hog futures pressured by supply concerns at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Thursday winds cause lodging in SE Minnesota corn fields


    Thursday winds cause lodging in SE Minnesota corn fields

    An extension crops educator who toured storm-damaged southeastern Minnesota says strong winds caused heavy lodging in corn fields.

    Dave Nicolai with the University of Minnesota tells Brownfield he traveled from Wright County east to Nerstrand Friday.

    “Primarily broken stalks broken below the ear, mixed in with standing corn.  So as you look out over the field, there’s a lot of variability within the corn.”

    He says the lodging will cause problems during harvest.

    Continue reading Thursday winds cause lodging in SE Minnesota corn fields at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Heavy rain delays South Dakota harvest


    Heavy rain delays South Dakota harvest

    Southeastern South Dakota farmer Dave Poppens looks forward to harvest but will have a longer wait on his farm near Sioux Falls.

    “We’ve had about six inches of rain in the last two days here,” Poppens told Brownfield Ag News Thursday.

    After a wet spring, Poppens is pleased that some of his corn is projected to make 185 bushels to the acre.

    “A lot of the beans were planted after the first of June,” said Poppens, “but the earlier variety beans, with the warmer weather we had last week, I think we probably could have got started [with harvest] on a couple of fields this week if we wouldn’t have had the rain.”

    There’s less rain in other areas. 

    Continue reading Heavy rain delays South Dakota harvest at Brownfield Ag News.