• It’s more than just money


    It’s more than just money

    Farmers need to be aware of what elevated stress is doing to their
    health. “There’s kind of a heavy set of factors that are impacting people and
    elevating stress levels,� says Sean Brotherson, a family life specialist at
    North Dakota State University. Drawn out weather and trade issues have
    seriously cut into farm profits, causing serious stress. It’s harming farmers’
    health, according to Brotherson.

    AUDIO: Managing for Profit with Sean Brotherson

    Continue reading It’s more than just money at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Simon the Soybean educates young people about soybeans


    Simon the Soybean educates young people about soybeans

    The Missouri
    Soybean Merchandising Council is reaching young people through the Simon the
    Soybean activity books. Tom Steever spoke to Christine Tew, Communications
    Director, Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council, who says the eight-page book
    of puzzles, mazes, pictures and other activities illustrates how soybeans are
    part of everyone’s daily life. To find out more, visit mosoy.org. Brought to you by Missouri’s soybean
    farmers and their checkoff.

    Continue reading Simon the Soybean educates young people about soybeans at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Agribusiness connection a key to Ag Education


    Minnesota Farm Bureau’s Post-Secondary Ag Educator of the
    Year says it’s important to have strong relationships with agribusinesses.

    Kim Lippert, who recently retired as ag department chair of Ridgewater College in Willmar, tells Brownfield instructors should be seeking professional development opportunities.

    “And not just supported by educational experiences, but also by industry. Where we can go to training many times that are supported by industry or our faculty.”

    And with ag technology constantly changing, she says hand’s on learning is most effective.

    Continue reading Agribusiness connection a key to Ag Education at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Milk futures, cash dairy mostly higher


    Milk futures, cash dairy mostly higher

    Milk futures on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange continued higher supported by global optimism.

    January Class III milk up two cents at
    $17.03.  February up 11 cents at $17.54. 
    March 14 cents higher at $17.76.  April
    up 18 cents at $17.69.  May through August
    contracts 12 to 15 cents higher.

    Dry whey down $0.0050 at $0.3625.  Nine sales were made at $0.3625 and $0.3650. 

    Blocks up $0.0025 at $1.9650.  Three trades were made at $1.9475 and $1.9550. 

    Barrels up $0.0350 at $1.5975.  Four trades were made at $1.5975 and $1.6025. 

    Butter unchanged at $1.88. 

    Nonfat dry milk up $0.0050 at $1.2950. 

    The Global
    Dairy Trade auction index in New Zealand traded nearly two percent higher, building
    on previous improvements.

    Continue reading Milk futures, cash dairy mostly higher at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Hog futures lower on profit taking, demand questions


    Hog futures lower on profit taking, demand questions

    Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle futures were mostly lower,
    getting ready for widespread direct cash business and the week’s USDA numbers.
    February was up $.02 at $126.37 and April was down $.02 at $127.22.

    Feeder cattle were mostly lower on the same factors as the live pit.
    January was $.27 lower at $145.07 and March was down $.32 at $144.67.

    Direct cash cattle markets were quiet. This week’s showlist looks
    mixed, mostly lower, and packer profit margins are tighter, which might limit
    spending and could push back the week’s business, maybe even until after the
    USDA’s Cattle on Feed report out Friday afternoon.

    Continue reading Hog futures lower on profit taking, demand questions at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Southeast Asian dairy imports add to optimism


    Southeast Asian dairy imports add to optimism

    The U.S. Dairy Export Council says significant export growth
    in Southeast Asia in recent months has been diving renewed optimism on the
    trade front.

    President Tom Vilsack tells Brownfield what’s beyond that…

    “We had in November the best sales of skim milk powder in a month in the history of the U.S. dairy industry and most of that was a result of significant increases in purchases in Southeast Asia.�

    He says a dispute between Indonesia and the European Union,
    increased cheese exports and improving relationships are also behind increased
    sales.

    Continue reading Southeast Asian dairy imports add to optimism at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • How long before basis widens back out?


    An extension grain marketing economist suggests basis levels
    are in a precarious spot.

    Ed Usset with the University of Minnesota says cash corn and soybean prices are relatively strong, a reflection of a short crop and drawn-out harvest.

    “A wide basis (at harvest) is often the result of too many bushels seeking limited storage space. Well, when you stretch out a harvest over a two month period, that crunch for space isn’t there.”

    He tells Brownfield Market Facilitation payments have also lessened the need for farmers to sell grain.

    Continue reading How long before basis widens back out? at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: January 21, 2020


    Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: January 21, 2020

    Mar. corn closed at $3.87 and 1/2, down 1 and 3/4 cents
    Mar. soybeans closed at $9.16, down 13 and 3/4 cents
    Mar. soybean meal closed at $299.10, down $1.50
    Mar. soybean oil closed at 32.75, down 60 points
    Mar. wheat closed at $5.70 and 1/2, up 5 and 1/4 cents
    Feb. live cattle closed at $126.37, up 2 cents
    Feb. lean hogs closed at $67.35, down 32 cents
    Feb.

    Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: January 21, 2020 at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Brazil’s soybean harvest is off to a slow start


    Brazil’s soybean harvest is off to a slow start

    Brazil’s soybean harvest is off to a slower start than last year.

    “In Brazil, the soybeans are 1.8 percent harvested–last year, it was six percent–so it’s off to a slower start,â€� says grain marketing consultant Dr. Michael Cordonnier, president of Illinois-based Soybean & Corn Advisor.

    Cordonnier, who
    keeps close tabs on the South American corn and soybean crops, is still
    predicting a record Brazilian soybean crop. But he says a late soybean harvest
    could impact the size of that country’s second crop of corn—the safrinha crop.

    Continue reading Brazil’s soybean harvest is off to a slow start at Brownfield Ag News.

         
  • Soybeans down, waiting for better demand from China


    Soybeans down, waiting for better demand from China

    Soybeans were lower on fund and technical selling, giving back Friday’s gains and then some. Beans continue to wait for some solid sign of increased buying interest from China under Phase One of the trade agreement. Weekly export inspections were bullish, mostly to China, but those were previously purchased beans and sales totals the last few weeks have been lackluster. Since the signing of Phase One on the 16th, no daily sales have been announced by the USDA and China’s Lunar New Year celebration is coming up later this week.

    Continue reading Soybeans down, waiting for better demand from China at Brownfield Ag News.